The Instafest Tool Creates Your Dream Festival Lineup Based On Your Spotify History – How To Try It

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Who would perform at YOUR festival? The Instafest tool creates your fantasy lineup based on your Spotify history – here’s how to try it

  • The Instafest tool creates the festival lineup of your dreams from your Spotify data
  • It can use your top performers from the last four weeks, the last six months, or all time
  • You are given a poster with three hypothetical days of music to share

Music fans all over the world are eagerly awaiting the release soon Spotify Wrapped, which reveals our hottest artists of the year every December.

But to keep things going, another tool has been released that simultaneously encourages us for the next festival season.

Called Instafest, the tool creates your ultimate festival lineup by picking the best artists from your Spotify listening history.

Created by Southern University California student Anshay Saboo, he presents your results in a Coachella-style poster featuring three hypothetical days of music.

Instafest builds your best festival lineup by selecting the best artists based on your listening history

Created by USC student Ansha Szabo, the tool presents your results in a Coachella-style poster featuring three days of music

You can also choose your poster aesthetic from Malibu Sunrise, LA Twilight or Mojave Dusk

Created by USC student Ansha Szabo, the tool presents your results in a Coachella-style poster featuring three days of music

HOW TO USE INSTAFEST

  1. Go to Instafest website.
  2. Click on the green “Sign in with Spotify” button.
  3. Log in to your account and your dream festival schedule will appear on the site.

Don’t worry if you’ve been listening to Christmas carols recently, as Instafest can use data from the last four weeks, the last six months, or the entire time.

You can also choose your poster aesthetic from Malibu Sunrise, LA Twilight or Mojave Dusk.

The lineup is automatically created with your username at the top, but you can hide this if, for example, you don’t want your weakness for ABBA to be traced back to you.

To get your lineup, first go to the page Instafest website.

Then click on the green “Sign in with Spotify” button, which will take you to the login page.

The site will then show you your poster, which you can share on social media – if you dare.

One Twitter user said: “Instafest made me realize my spotify is a disaster, I’m going to log out for a month and rethink my music choices”

Unfortunately, the third-party service is not yet compatible with Apple Music and other streaming services.

Don't worry if you've been listening to Christmas carols recently, as Instafest can use data from the last four weeks, the last six months or the entire time

Don’t worry if you’ve been listening to Christmas carols recently, as Instafest can use data from the last four weeks, the last six months or the entire time

Unfortunately, the service is not yet compatible with Apple Music and other streaming services

Unfortunately, the service is not yet compatible with Apple Music and other streaming services

You can also choose the aesthetic of your poster or hide your Spotify username if you don't want your weakness for ABBA to be traced back to you

You can also choose the aesthetic of your poster or hide your Spotify username if you don’t want your weakness for ABBA to be traced back to you

Earlier this month, the British Heart Foundation (BHF) also launched a tool that creates a playlist of your favorite tracks that it is best to perform CPR.

The ideal tempo for chest compressions is between 100 and 120 beats per minute, and it’s easier to follow if you have a song in your head.

You can create your own playlist by visiting lifesavingbeats.com and clicking “Sign in with Spotify” and learn how to perform CPR with help RevivR training tool.

The latter also teaches users step-by-step how to recognize a cardiac arrest and how to use a defibrillator in just 15 minutes.

Dr Charmaine Griffiths, chief executive of the BHF, said: “With more than 30,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the UK each year and a survival rate of less than one in 10, there is an urgent need for people to learn CPR in an accessible and engaging way.

“BHF’s Lifesaving Rhythms enable thousands of people across the country to do just that.”

Number 1 singles are shorter and slower than they were 70 years ago, research shows

Pop songs are getting shorter, with the average length of a No.1 now closer to three minutes than four, new analysis has found.

Chart analysts blame this trend on the demise of CDs such as streaming services Spotify and Apple Music, which turn us away from the player.

According to chart analyst and historian James Masterton, artists ditch the long intro to find a catchy hook that can lead to a viral hit.

Speaking to MailOnline, he said: ‘The trend towards shorter song lengths has a lot to do with how producers are targeting tracks for the streaming audience.

“Long instrumental intros are a thing of the past, you need to get to the heart of the song as quickly as possible so people don’t click.”

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