Transgender Nonbinary California Teacher Teaches Kids Gender Pronouns With Stuffed UNICORN

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A California elementary school accepted to TikTok explain how they use stuffed animals to help teach their young class about “gender fluidity’ and how to use the correct pronouns.

Sky Tooley, who currently teaches fifth grade at Saturn Street Elementary School in Los Angeles identifies as a “non-binary trans demiboy”.

On TikTok, Tooley shared his thoughts on how best to teach young children that there are not just boys and girls, but a whole spectrum of genders.

“There are many more genders in the universe,” Tully tells her 13,000 followers, using a toy to demonstrate.

“It’s a unicorn llama… I thought it was so cute to let my kids name a unicorn llama. It was a mistake. So this little llama is gender-fluid; we’re going to practice pronouns with this little llama,” Tully continued.

Sky Tully currently teaches fifth grade at Saturn Street Elementary School in Los Angeles and describes herself as a “non-binary trans demi-boy.”

A teacher used a flip chart in the classroom to tackle the difficult topic of pronouns

A teacher used a flip chart in the classroom to tackle the difficult topic of pronouns

‘[Children] very prepared for these topics and much more accepting than adults when it comes to discussing these topics and talking about gender, gender assumptions, pronouns, all that. And it corresponds to the child’s development and age,” insisted the teacher, writing down various pronouns on the board in the classroom.

Tooley tried to explain a complex subject using a stuffed narwhal toy as an example of using a toy animal that they said has the pronouns they/them.

‘I started talking [to students] about Norbert Narwhal … who uses they/them pronouns and we practice making mistakes with their pronouns as well as correcting them.’

The school seems perfectly comfortable with such advanced ideas for a primary school, with Tully’s description of his own philosophy appearing on school website and for the first time reported a Fox News.

Tooley used animated plushies, including the unicorn pictured above and a narwhal, to explain

Tooley used animated plushies, including the unicorn pictured above and a narwhal, to explain ‘gender fluidity’

“I strive to create a safe space for my students. We work to be uncomfortable, challenged and relatable. We work to understand our identity, bias and privilege,” Tully said.

Saturn Street Elementary looks progressive and even has a “rainbow club” that Tooley hopes will be expanded to include younger students, including the third grade, where students are eight to nine years old.

“Rainbow Club is actually the GSA for the elementary grades… One of the great things about Rainbow Club is the conversations about different identities, who we are, and how to support the LGBTQ+ community. Students may not necessarily be absent, but they are excited to learn and help others,” Tooley said.

Tooley defends their introduction of gender into the classroom at such a young age, arguing that children really need such lessons to help them develop

A description of the teacher's philosophy appears on the school's website.  “I strive to create a safe space for my students.  We work to be uncomfortable, challenged and relatable.  We work to understand our identity, bias and privilege,” Tully writes

A description of the teacher’s philosophy appears on the school’s website. “I strive to create a safe space for my students. We work to be uncomfortable, challenged and relatable. We work to understand our identity, bias and privilege,” Tully writes

Tooley makes it very clear which pronouns they prefer to refer to them

Tooley makes it very clear which pronouns they prefer to refer to them

“I realized that so many of my students already viewed themselves, their bodies, and even their gender negatively.

“All of this means that the gender binary is constantly harming us day in and day out. Only a few people gain power from it. Everyone else strives to conform to social norms. This damage, as we can already see, starts at a young age,” Tully suggested.

Tully argues that such classroom discussions are “developmentally appropriate, part of our curriculum because we know our gender at a young age and our sexuality at a young age.”

Tooley, who previously taught third- and fourth-grade classes, is eager for other teachers to follow his lead and address the issue of gender ideology.

“Educators, especially on the elementary school side, will be like, ‘Well, I can’t teach LGBTQ+ people because they’re just not ready for it…’ Our kids are … queer. They ask, are interested. They want to see it. You just have to talk about it so people know how to be respectful and empathetic.”

Tully argues that such classroom discussions are

Tully argues that such classroom discussions are “developmentally appropriate, part of our curriculum because we know our gender at a young age and our sexuality at a young age.”

Tooley, who previously taught third- and fourth-grade classes, is eager for other teachers to follow his lead and address the issue of gender ideology.

Tooley, who previously taught third- and fourth-grade classes, is eager for other teachers to follow his lead and address the issue of gender ideology.

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