Coastal California sunflowers are no longer endangered

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According to a press release from the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has classified Laya Beach as endangered after 30 years of endangered life.

This reclassification means that beach bark is no longer endangered in most or all of its habitat.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website, species are listed as endangered if they are endangered in the foreseeable future.

In 1992, Laia Beach was first listed as endangered due to habitat disturbance caused by humans.

The Center for Biological Diversity says flowers are still threatened by drought, grazing, pesticide use and climate change.

The return of the sunflower was aided by a 1998 restoration plan that created reserves and protected areas.

Large populations of sunflower can now be found in Humboldt County, and a small population at the Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara County.



Coastal California sunflowers are no longer endangered

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