Dad builds a tiny house in memory of his dead daughter

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It’s been more than three years since Jaina Kelly was killed while she was picking up trash on the side of the Wisconsin highway. She was only 9 years old. Now her father values ​​her life by taking care of other lives. “It’s kind of insulting to hear that there are homeless children in the community,” Brian Kelly said. Unfortunately, Kelly said, this is the reality. So he and his family are doing something about it – renovating an old concession kiosk into a tiny house to be handed over to Hope Village, a non-profit organization that builds and maintains tiny homes for families and individuals with financial difficulties. “It will be more. A tiny house. At the back of it there will be bunks for four people and we know there will be families here,” Kelly said. “So we’re happy to be able to help them.” Kelly said Hope Village, based in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, currently has 10 tiny homes, all of which are currently occupied. Kelly’s donation is important because it will give another family the opportunity to leave the street, but it is also special because it is a donation in memory of his little girl. “She was a little more of a troublemaker than her sister,” Kelly said. . “She could definitely push her boundaries. But a really sweet, kind child. Always happy. Always fun. Always playing.” In November 2018, Jaina was among three scouts and a mother who died when a truck veered off the road, hitting a group as they collected rubbish along the P. County Highway. Today, Kelly turns this tragedy into action through the Jane Kelly Memorial Foundation. “We were able to donate, I think, $ 120,000 last year to various projects. We create play sets, we fund various children’s activities and programs across the community. It’s really neat,” Kelly said. This tiny house is their latest project. “It’s just good to have something positive happen after just the last few years with the court and all the things we had to go through, leave it behind and start moving forward,” Kelly added. Kelly said he believes Jaina would also be proud of all the work done on her behalf. “I think she would be happy. I think if she was here, she would help. I know she will,” Kelly said. “She loved helping me with things. A few days like my little friend from Tagalong. I’m sure she’ll be here helping me right.”

It’s been more than three years since Jaina Kelly was killed while she was picking up trash on the side of the Wisconsin highway. She was only 9 years old.

Now her father values ​​her life by taking care of other lives.

“It’s kind of insulting when you hear there are homeless kids in the community,” Brian Kelly said.

Unfortunately, Kelly said, this is the reality. So he and his family are doing something about it – renovating an old concession kiosk into a tiny house to be donated by Hope Village, a non-profit organization that builds and maintains tiny homes for families and individuals with financial difficulties.

“It will be a bigger tiny house. There will be bunks for four people in the back of it, and we know there will be times when there will be families here,” Kelly said. “So we’re glad we can help them.”

Kelly said Hope Village, based in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, currently has 10 tiny homes, all of which are currently occupied. Kelly’s donation is important because it will give another family the opportunity to leave the street, but it is also special because it is a donation in memory of his little girl.

“[Jayna] was a little more of a troublemaker than her sister, ”Kelly said.“ She certainly could push her boundaries. But really cute, good baby. Always happy. Always fun. I always play hard. “

In November 2018, Jaina was among three girl scouts and a mother who died when a truck veered off the road, striking a group as they were collecting trash on County Highway P.

Today, Kelly is turning this tragedy into action through the Jain Kelly Memorial Foundation.

“I think last year we were able to donate $ 120,000 to various projects. We create play sets, fund various children’s activities and programs across the community. It’s really beautiful,” Kelly said.

This tiny house is their latest project.

“It’s just nice to have something positive happen after just the last few years with the court and all the things we had to go through, leave it behind and start moving forward,” Kelly added.

Kelly said she believes Jane will also be proud of all the work done on her behalf.

“I think she would be happy. I think if she was here, she would help. I know she will,” Kelly said. “She loved helping me with things. A few days like my little buddy. I’m sure she would be here and helping me now.”

See the video above for more on this story.

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