From the archives: 60 years ago, the Cuban missile crisis brought the US and Russia to the brink of nuclear conflict

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Sixty years ago, more than 10,000 of the District’s Marines began a secret withdrawal because of President Kennedy’s warning about the threat of Russian missiles in Cuba. The Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962 was the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to nuclear conflict during the Cold War.

In a nationally televised address on October 22, 1962, President John F. Kennedy demanded the withdrawal of Soviet missiles from Cuba and imposed a naval blockade to prevent additional weapons from reaching the island.

On October 28, the USSR announced the removal and dismantling of the weapons in question. In return, the United States withdrew Jupiter missiles from Turkey.

Local Marines began returning home on December 9.

From The Evening Tribune, Tuesday 23 October 1962:

The US and Russia are driven by showdowns at sea; Blockade of Latins

CUBAN CRISIS ALERT WORLDWIDE

Here is a brief overview of the Cuban Missile Crisis:

Moscow — Russia cancels all military furloughs, convenes a conference of Warsaw Pact countries, condemns the American blockade of Cuba as a step toward nuclear war.

American states — Twenty Latin American countries at an emergency meeting supported the determination of the United States to prevent Russia’s aggressive actions in Cuba.

Reaction – US allies, led by Great Britain, supported the blocking decision.

Castro – orders his men to the military base, mobilizes the troops on 24-hour alert.

Presidents – Former President Hoover and Truman support Kennedy’s actions: Former President Eisenhower does not comment

Supports SD — Most San Diego residents rally at President Kennedy’s call. Collection of comments.

Telegrams — More than 200 electronic messages are sent from San Diego to President Kennedy and Washington, the largest volume in years.

Camp Pendleton — The Marine Corps base transmits troop movement messages to the Pentagon. Oceanside resident reports convoy activity.

Emergency Orders — Ships from San Diego bound for Hawaii are recalled as a result of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

A poll in San Diego supports the president

San Diegans appear to fully support President Kennedy’s blockade of Cuba.

Review of San Diego views on Cuban missile crisis from page A2 of the Evening Tribune, Tuesday, October 23, 1962.

(Evening Tribune)

Here’s what they say:

William G. Sandor, 5224 Canterbury Drive, Kensington: “We are Americans. We should be behind the president. Too much time has passed. Something had to be done when American property began to be confiscated in Cuba.”

Mrs. Sylvia Anderson, 1171 Naranca St., El Cajon: “we all knew it was coming. It should have been done a few weeks ago when we found out about the missile bases. It’s time to show the Russians that we’re serious.”

AP Molnar, 817 Portsmouth Court, Mission Beach: “I’m glad, man. I’m glad he said so. It’s time to take a positive stance. It’s like having a Russian missile in your backyard. I do not believe that Russia will start a war.”

Mrs. Betty Willett, 1454 La Corta Circle, Lemon Grove: “It was very horrible. I think we will be at war in the next few months.

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