House of Representatives to vote on bill to prevent domestic terrorism after Buffalo massacre

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The House of Representatives is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill aimed at preventing domestic terrorism and combating the threat of violent extremism from white supremacists. The vote came after a horrific mass shooting last weekend at a supermarket in a predominantly black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, killing 10 people and injuring three others. The Justice Department is investigating the shooting as a hate crime and an “act of violent racial extremism.” The bill to be passed by the House of Representatives – the 2022 Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act – is sponsored by Democrat Brad Schneider of Illinois. He has three Republican sponsors: Representative Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Don Bacon of Nebraska and Fred Upton of Michigan. It is unclear how much additional support Republicans he can get when it comes to voting in the House of Representatives. The bill, as expected, is passed in the House of Representatives, controlled by Democrats, then it will be sent to the Senate, where its fate is uncertain. The bill provides for the establishment of offices specifically dedicated to domestic terrorism, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice and the FBI will monitor and analyze domestic terrorist activities to better prepare the federal government to identify risks for preventive action. The bill sets a requirement for biennial reporting on threats to domestic terrorism. He also called for an assessment of the threat posed by white sufferers and neo-Nazis. Leaders of the Democratic Chamber had planned to pass an earlier version of the bill in April, but efforts were thwarted after progressive members opposed the move, which they said could be used to attack civil rights activists or left-wing groups. House Majority leader Stanny Hoyer said he believes the issues are resolved. “We’ve worked out some issues that concern people’s civil liberties that were legitimate, and I think we’ve solved that, and I think we agree with that,” Hoer said during a weekly meeting with reporters. Earlier this week, Schneider called on the House of Representatives to pass the bill quickly after the Buffalo shooting. Americans across the country, “he said in a statement.” The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act is something Congress can do this week to try to prevent future Buffalo shootings – to prevent future shootings in California, future shootings in El Paso , future shootings in Charleston, future shootings in Pittsburgh, future shootings in Wisconsin. We must ensure that Federal law enforcement agencies have the necessary resources to best prevent and prevent extremist violence wherever there is a threat. “An official familiar with the investigation. The alleged gunman made alarming statements describing his motives and soul After the arrest, the statement said, the statements were clear and filled with hatred for the black community.Investigators also found other information from search warrants and other methods indicating that the alleged shooter “studied” previous hate attacks and shootings, the official said. Eleven of those shot were black, officials said, with victims ranging in age from 20 to 86. Buffalo police identified all 13 victims on Sunday, including a former police officer trying to stop the shooter, the eight-year-old mother of a former city fire commissioner and a longtime substitute teacher.

The House of Representatives is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill aimed at preventing domestic terrorism and combating the threat of violent extremism by white supremacists.

The vote came after a horrific mass shooting last weekend at a supermarket in a predominantly black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, that killed 10 people and injured three. Ministry of Justice is investigating the shooting as a hate crime and an “act of violent racial extremism”.

The bill to be considered by the House of Representatives – the Law on the Prevention of Internal Terrorism in 2022 – is sponsored Democratic representative Brad Schneider of Illinois. He has three Republican sponsors: Representative Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Don Bacon of Nebraska and Fred Upton of Michigan.

It is unclear how much additional support Republicans he can get when it comes to voting in the House of Representatives.

Once the bill, as expected, is passed by the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives, it will be sent to the Senate, where its fate remains uncertain.

The bill provides for the establishment of offices in the Ministry of Homeland Security, the Ministry of Justice and the FBI, specifically dedicated to domestic terrorism.

Departments will monitor and analyze domestic terrorist activities to better prepare the federal government to identify risks for preventive action.

The bill sets a requirement for biennial reporting on threats to domestic terrorism. He also called for an assessment of the threat posed by white sufferers and neo-Nazis.

Democratic Party leaders in the House of Representatives had planned to submit the previous version of the bill in April, but efforts were thwarted after progressive members opposed the move, which they said could be used to fight civil rights activists or left-wing groups. . The leader of the majority in the House of Representatives, Stanny Hoyer, said he believed the issues were resolved.

“We’ve worked out some of the issues that concern people’s civil liberties that were legitimate, and I think we’ve worked that out, and I think we’re going to agree on that,” Hoer said during a weekly meeting with reporters. .

Earlier this week, Schneider called at the House to quickly pass the bill after the Buffalo shooting.

“The rise of racially motivated violent extremism is a serious threat to Americans across the country,” he said in a statement. “The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act is what Congress can do this week to try to prevent future Buffalo executions – to prevent future shootings in California, future shootings in El Paso, future shootings in Charleston, future shootings in Pittsburgh, future “The shootings in Wisconsin. We must ensure that Federal law enforcement agencies have the necessary resources to best prevent and prevent extremist violence wherever there is a threat.”

An 18-year-old man suspected of opening fire at a Buffalo supermarket on Saturday told authorities he was targeting a black community, according to an official familiar with the investigation.

The alleged gunman made alarming statements describing his motives and state of mind after his arrest, the official said. The statements were clear and filled with hatred for the black community. Investigators also found other information from search warrants and other methods that suggest the alleged shooter “studied” previous hate attacks and shootings, the official said.

According to officials, the eleven shot were black. The victims are between 20 and 86 years old, police said. Buffalo police identified all 13 victims on Sunday. Among them were a former police officer who tried to stop the shooter, an eight-year-old mother of a former city fire commissioner and a longtime substitute teacher.

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