Morning Report: Former City Real Estate Chief Says Landlord Denied Payment to “Volunteer” Advisor

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The former property manager of the city recently testified under oath that she directly asked the city owner 101 Ash St. and Civic Center Plaza at least twice, whether the company pays the city’s alleged volunteer real estate adviser.

Twice former city real estate director Sibela Thompson recalled during the April 28 ruling that Cisterra director Jason Wood said no.

As it turned out, Cisterra admitted a few years later that it had paid Hughes $ 9.4 million for his work on the lease of the city’s 101 Ash and Civic Center Plaza.

In a new story our Lisa Halverstadt detailed Thompson’s memoirs about her conversations with Sister, why she never faced Hughes with the same question and more.

A Cisterra spokesman denied Thompson’s recollection, saying Wood never told anyone in the city that then-city councilor Jason Hughes was not being paid.

Read more about Thompson’s deposit here.

The city prosecutor’s office is still waiting for a message from the former COO

The office of City Attorney Marie Elliott claims that former chief operating officer Chris Mitchell has not yet responded to a May 11 letter accusing the former city bureaucrat of ordering the city’s information technology department to clear documents tied to 101 Ash Street and Civic Center Plaza until her sudden resignation.

Eliot’s office said Michel did not contact Late Monday night, despite a request from a former unelected official to contact the city’s prosecutor’s office by Monday to “begin the process of identifying and restoring all city records.”

It is unclear what steps the city prosecutor’s office will take next, but lawyers who oppose the city, in lawsuits related to his transactions 101 Ash and Civic Center want to pounce.

Lawyer Michael Rainey, representing city landlord Cisterra Development, on Friday formally demanded that the “self-aware man” about the city’s allegations and actions around Michelle’s alleged order remove phone and computer records. Rainey also requested relevant records.

And attorney Michael Athanasio, who represents former “volunteer” city real estate counselor Sister paid millions for work on two city rentstold the Voice that he plans to summon Michelle to court to testify.

Michelle did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday.

Chula Vista City Council intends to consider a ban on eviction

After in traces of their neighbors to the northChula-Vista City Council at today’s meeting should consider banning evictions.

To be considered two options of innocent eviction. Such evictions are due to the fact that the owner wants to remove the object from the rental market for various reasons other than non-payment.

The first option is a permanent decree, and the second is an emergency decree, which will run until September 30 and will give city officials time to continue to find a more permanent solution.

Tenant protection groups openly state the need for such protection, but landlords, especially people with multiple leases, are concerned that the proposed rules go too far and make it impossible for them to continue renting their property.

See the meeting here today at 5 p.m.

Judge declares illegal Atkins bill requiring women to join corporate boards

State Senator Tony Atkins speaks at a press conference / Photo by Megan Wood

Last week, a Los Angeles Supreme Court judge ruled that the 2018 state law, authored by San Diego Senate Speaker Tony Atkins, which requires three women to serve on corporate boards this year, is unconstitutional due to violation of the equal protection clause since This was reported on Monday by the Associated Press.

This decision was not entirely surprising; Former Gov. Jerry Brown, when he signed the bill in the fall of 2018, signaled that it could be his destiny. “There have been many objections to this bill, and serious legal issues have been raised,” he said. reports the LA Times. “I am not diminishing the possible shortcomings that could indeed prove fatal to its eventual implementation. However, recent events in Washington, DC – and beyond – show that many do not understand this message. He signed the bill while Judge Brett Cavanaugh’s candidacy was considered by the full Senate.

These issues, however, have not stopped the rapid progress on this issue in the state since its adoption. Like Sarah Libby reported for us in 2020more than a dozen San Diego companies have included women on their board in the year since the law went into effect.

In other news

  • The policy of the pandemic is that reduced some offenses to zero bail across the San Diego County prison system ended Sunday. The zero-bail policy was designed to reduce the total number of prisoners during the COVID-19 pandemic. The San Diego Sheriff’s Department said the changes are likely to increase the population of county jails. (CBS 8)
  • The Police Practice Commission, the San Diego Police Oversight Commission, sent a note to the San Diego Police Department with several recommendations, including changes to the process of department discipline and the protocols of the cameras worn on the body. The commission is considering investigations into complaints against officers, shootings by police officers and the deaths of detainees. (Union-Tribune)
  • San Diego Humane Society expanding your promotion to waive the adoption fee for small animals and adult dogs seven months and older by Thursday. (NBC-7)
  • San Diego District Attorney’s Office dropped the murder charges with Jane Dorothy 22 years after a jury found Vista guilty of murdering her husband near their home in the Valley Center. (Union Tribune)

The morning report was written by Lisa Halverstadt, Andrew Keats, Andrea Lopez-Vilafana and Tigist Lane. It was edited by Megan Wood.

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