The 9-year-old deaf cheerleader challenges the odds

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A 9-year-old girl from Florida challenges opportunities and inspires young athletes. Brooklyn Cooper is deaf, but that doesn’t stop her from being part of a fan team. Brooklyn has been deaf since 2 years old and it shows the world that nothing is impossible, even with a disability. “It was quite difficult because she had never been encouraged before, never had to count on blows,” said Brooklyn’s mother, Elizabeth Cooper. What used to be difficult has now become a hobby for Brooklyn. From competitions outside of Florida to collecting medals, Brooklyn impressed everyone around, including coveted coach Sheila Ross. “The first contest came and went, we saw the light in her eyes, and her mom says, ‘Where are we from here?’ We just said about one competition, and I said, “I’m not a coach if I can’t stand the season,” Ross said. Coach Ross didn’t let her. “Never give up on what you want to do in life, focus on your abilities, not your disability,” Ross said. Usually Brooklyn depends on its cochlear implants, but not during competitions. “Usually I hold my breath during a performance and then I cry because I’m so proud. I’m so proud,” Cooper said. The Brooklyn Support Team hopes it inspires other people with disabilities. “I hope she will be an inspiration to others, just because you have a disability doesn’t mean you can’t do something – you’re just working on it a little bit more,” Cooper said.

The 9-year-old from Florida challenges challenges and inspires young athletes.

Brooklyn Cooper is deaf, but that doesn’t stop her from being part of a fan team.

Brooklyn has been deaf since 2 years old and it shows the world that nothing is impossible, even with a disability.

“It was quite difficult because she had never been encouraged before, never had to count on blows,” said Brooklyn’s mother, Elizabeth Cooper.

What used to be difficult has now become a hobby for Brooklyn. From competitions outside of Florida to collecting medals, Brooklyn impressed everyone around, including coveted coach Sheila Ross.

“The first contest came and went, we saw the light in her eyes, and her mom says, ‘Where are we from here?’ We just talked about one competition, and I said, “I’m not a coach if I can’t stand the season,” Ross said.

Brooklyn is the only cheerleader on her team who is deaf, but that hasn’t stopped coach Ross from letting her go.

“Never give up on what you want to do in life, focus on your abilities, not your shortcomings,” Ross said.

Brooklyn usually depends on her cochlear implants to hear, but not during competitions.

“Usually during a performance I hold my breath and then cry because I’m so proud. I’m so proud, ”says Cooper.

The Brooklyn Support Team hopes it inspires other people with disabilities.

“I hope she will be an inspiration to others, just because you have a disability doesn’t mean you can’t do something – you’re just working on it a little bit more,” Cooper said.

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