The CSUMB president bequeaths the service and higher alumni performance

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After the postponement of retirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Edward Ochoa, Ph.D., president of California State University, Monterey Bay, is ready to hang his hat. His last day will be June 30th. A new president has not yet been determined; the school is in the final round of interviews. Since arriving in 2012, Ochoa has helped increase the number of CSUMB graduates from 27.1% in 2012 to 40.3% in 2017. In addition, it has expanded the educational capabilities of CSUMB, the physical campus and the number of faculty. Under Ochoa’s leadership, CSUMB increased the number of faculty by 39%. In addition, Ochoa helped establish the College of Business and managed the rehabilitation of a 40,558-square-foot campus. The college also removed 111 dilapidated buildings and built four new ones: the Cape Building, the Business and Information Technology Building, the Humanities and Social Sciences Building, and the Otter Student Union. “I often tell my teachers and staff that we are one of the few industries where we can feel very good about our product without reservation. There are no downsides to what we do,” Ochoa said. Ochoa’s career in higher education goes far beyond Monterey County. For nearly four decades, Ochoa served in the University of California system and worked on five different campuses as a professor, dean, and later president. He also served in the Obama administration as an assistant secretary of higher education for two years. During it there was the development of a college performance map that tracks the performance of graduates by institutions. “It opened up a whole new world to look at how well educational institutions work,” Ochoa said. “Before, US News and World Report was the only ranking of universities that people looked at. They were very biased and attached too much importance to reputation and didn’t really measure the effectiveness of institutions. Thanks to this new connection, we were able to show which institution it was. is the most successful in promoting upward mobility among its students. And in fact, California State University campuses have come out on top in the national rankings. ” There was a little over a month left, and Ochoa said he was looking forward to more time to rest. “I’m going to take the advice that a lot of people have given me, and basically not take on any serious commitments for six months,” Ochoa said. “Just relax, relax, let things settle down and see where my interests really are. I imagine I will be doing something else. I like to keep growing and learning. ”

After the postponement of retirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Edward Ochoa, Ph.D., president of California State University, Monterey Bay, is ready to hang his hat. His last day will be June 30th.

The decision on a new president has not been made; the school is in the final round of interviews.

Since arriving in 2012, Ochoa has helped increase CSUMB alumni rates from 27.1% in 2012 to 40.3% in 2017.

In addition, it has expanded the educational capabilities of CSUMB, the physical campus and the number of faculty.

Under Ochoa’s leadership, CSUMB increased the number of faculty by 39%. In addition, Ochoa helped establish the College of Business and managed the rehabilitation of a 40,558-square-foot campus. The college also removed 111 dilapidated buildings and built four new ones: the Cape Building, the Business and Information Technology Building, the Humanities and Social Sciences Building, and the Otter Student Union.

“I often tell my teachers and staff that we are one of the few industries where we can feel very good about our product without reservation. There are no downsides to what we do,” Ochoa said.

Ochoa’s career in higher education goes far beyond Monterey County.

For nearly four decades, Ochoa served in the University of California system and worked on five different campuses as a professor, dean, and later president.

He also served in the Obama administration as an assistant secretary of higher education for two years. During it there was the development of a college performance map that tracks the performance of graduates by institutions.

“It’s [College Scorecard] opened up a whole new world of how well institutions work, “Ochoa said.” Before that, American news and the World Report was the only university ranking in which people looked at it. They were very biased and attached too much importance to reputation and did not measure the effectiveness of institutions. With this new connection, we were able to show which institution was most successful in promoting upward mobility among its students. In fact, the campuses of the California State University came out on top in the national rankings.

There was a little over a month left, and Ochoa said he was looking forward to more time to rest.

“I’m going to take the advice that a lot of people have given me, and basically not take on any serious commitments for six months,” Ochoa said. “Just relax, unwind, let things settle down and see where my interests really are. I imagine I will be doing something else. I like to keep growing and learning. ”

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