The death rate from COVID-19 among those vaccinated is growing

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Ever since vaccines against COVID-19 became widely available, there has been a large gap in the number of deaths between vaccinated and unvaccinated. But recent deaths from COVID are divided much more evenly as high-transmission options are strengthened, vaccine protection is reduced, and stimulant uptake is stagnant. have become more common in recent months, exposing vulnerable groups to increased risk of serious illness or death as more and more transmissible options continue to spread. This seems to be especially true for older people in the United States, who were among the first to receive the initial series of vaccines. In the second half of September – the height of the delta wave – less than a quarter of all deaths from COVID-19 were among vaccinated people, according to federal data. But in January and February, amid an omicron surge, more than 40% of deaths from COVID-19 were among vaccinated people. COVID-19 vaccines have saved millions of lives in the United States since the first vaccination was introduced in December 2020. Unvaccinated people are still much more likely to be hospitalized or die than people vaccinated with at least two doses of Moderna / P or mRNA vaccine. BioNTech or a single dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine. of those vaccinated people who died from the COVID-19 breakthrough in January and February, less than a third were vaccinated, according to an analysis by CNN from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The remaining two-thirds received only the main series. Overall, the risk of death from COVID-19 is still about five times higher for unvaccinated people than for those vaccinated with at least their main series, CDC data show. But there is also a significant difference in the level of vaccination: age-adjusted people vaccinated with only the initial series of vaccinations are about three times more likely to die than those who have also received additional vaccinations. The CDC encourages people to be “up-to-date” on COVID-19 vaccinations – which includes getting revaccinators at the appropriate time – but still identifies a person who should be “fully vaccinated” if he or she has received at least the initial series of vaccinations. But this week, a senior Biden administration official was more straightforward: all adults need a third vaccination. Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself from COVID-19, and protection is most effective with at least three vaccinations, the official said. Others stress d the importance of boosters to save lives also “Almost no one in this country should die from COVID” with modern vaccinations and appropriate antiviral treatments, Dr Robert Calif, commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on Saturday at CNN Newsroom. “We really need to worry about getting the boosters we need to stay up to date so that with the new options we have, we don’t have unnecessary deaths and hospitalizations.” Older people are most at risk. In the first year of the pandemic, even before vaccines appeared, the vast majority of deaths from COVID-19 – more than 80% – were among the elderly aged 65 and over. In 2021, especially during the delta burst, the average age of people dying from COVID-19 changed to younger. According to preliminary CDC data, less than 60% of those killed in September were 65 years of age or older. so far this year about three-quarters of all deaths from COVID-19 have been among the elderly. Studies show that the effectiveness of the vaccine against COVID-19 decreases over time. CDC data released in January showed a 90% increase in efficacy in preventing hospitalization during a period when omicron was the dominant option. By comparison, getting two injections was 57% effective when at least six months had passed since the second injection. The vast majority of seniors completed their original series over a year ago. And while older people are vaccinated better than other age groups, less than two-thirds of older people are vaccinated. Now the CDC recommends a second vaccination for this age group as well, and consumption is even lower. CNN Analysis CDC data in recent months suggest that differences in risk among vaccinated people who received an increase compared to those with only the initial series are most noticeable among this vulnerable age group. Death from COVID-19 can be prevented. The daily death toll from COVID-19 in the U.S. has dropped to a fraction of what it was in January and February amid an omicron surge, but hundreds are still dying every day. Now the number of cases is growing in almost all states, and the White House has warned that next fall and winter could cause another wave of 100 million new cases – both increased capacity for more serious diseases and tragic losses. But experts say we have the tools to ensure that infections do not become tragic. More Americans Fight COVID-19 On Monday, Dr. Peter Marx, director of the FDA’s Center for Biological Substance Evaluation and Research, will make a big difference as the country approaches fall and winter. “It’s really important that we try to get half – or a little over half – Americans who only got two doses to get that third dose,” he said. “It could affect the way we move forward, and especially it could affect the fact that we are entering the next wave of COVID-19.”

Since vaccines against COVID-19 have become widely available, there has been a large gap in mortality between vaccinated and unvaccinated.

But recent deaths from COVID are divided much more evenly as high-transmissibility options are strengthened, vaccine protection is weakened, and booster uptake is stagnant.

Breakthrough infections have become more common in recent months, exposing vulnerable populations to increased risk of serious illness or death as more and more transmissible options continue to spread. This seems to be especially true for older people in the United States, who were among the first to receive the original series of vaccines.

In the second half of September – the height of the delta wave – less than a quarter of all deaths from COVID-19 were vaccinated, according to federal data. But in January and February, amid an omicron surge, more than 40% of deaths from COVID-19 were among those vaccinated.

COVID-19 vaccines have saved millions of lives in the United States since the first vaccination in December 2020, and unvaccinated people are still much more likely to be hospitalized or die than people vaccinated with at least two doses of Moderna or mRNA vaccine / BioNTech or a single dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

But the evidence continues to build around the critical importance of amplifying shots.

Of those vaccinated people who died from the COVID-19 breakthrough in January and February, less than a third received revaccination, according to an analysis by CNN from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The remaining two-thirds received only the main series.

Overall, the risk of death from COVID-19 is still about five times higher for unvaccinated people than for those vaccinated with at least their primary series, CDC data show.

But there is a significant difference in the level of vaccination: age-adjusted people vaccinated with only the initial series were about three times more likely to die than those who were also vaccinated.

The CDC recommends that people be aware of vaccinations against COVID-19 – which includes getting revaccinated at the appropriate time – but still identifies a person who should be “fully vaccinated” if he or she has received at least the initial series of vaccinations.

But this week, a senior Biden administration official was more direct: all adults need a third joke.

Vaccination is the best way for people to protect themselves from COVID-19, and protection is most effective with a minimum of three vaccinations, the official said.

Others also emphasize the importance of boosters to save lives.

“Almost no one in this country should die from COVID” with modern vaccinations and appropriate antiviral treatments, Dr Robert Calif, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, told CNN Newsroom on Saturday.

“We really need to worry that we need to be aware of the amps so that with the new options we have, we don’t have unnecessary deaths and hospitalizations.”

Boosters are most beneficial to high-risk seniors

In the first year of the pandemic, even before vaccines appeared, the vast majority of deaths from COVID-19 – more than 80% – were among the elderly aged 65 and over.

In 2021, especially during the delta burst, the average age of people dying from COVID-19 changed to younger. According to preliminary CDC data, less than 60% of those who died in September were 65 years of age or older.

But 2022 was more reminiscent of 2020 and the first winter surge; so far this year about three-quarters of all deaths from COVID-19 have been among the elderly.

Studies show that the effectiveness of the vaccine against COVID-19 weakens over time. CDC data were released in January found a 90% increase in efficacy in preventing hospitalization during the period when omicron was the dominant option. By comparison, getting two injections was 57% effective if at least six months had passed since the second injection.

The vast majority of seniors completed their original series over a year ago. And while older people are better than other age groups, less than two-thirds of older people are vaccinated.

The CDC now recommends a second vaccination for this age group, and consumption is even lower.

CNN’s analysis of CDC data in recent months suggests that differences in risk among vaccinated people who received an increase compared to those with only the initial series are most noticeable among this vulnerable age group.

Deaths from COVID-19 can be prevented

The daily death toll from COVID-19 in the U.S. has dropped to a fraction of what it was in January and February amid an omicron surge, but hundreds are still dying every day.

Now the number of cases is growing in almost all states, and the White House has warned that next fall and winter could cause another wave. 100 million new cases – both increasing the potential for more serious diseases and tragic loss.

But experts say we have the tools to keep the infection from turning tragic.

As Dr. Peter Marx, director of the FDA’s Center for Biological Drug Assessment and Research, said Monday, stimulating more Americans against COVID-19 could significantly affect the country’s approach to fall and winter.

“It’s really important that we try to get half – or a little more than half – Americans who only got two doses to get that third dose,” he said. “It could affect the way we move forward, and especially it could affect the fact that we are entering the next wave of COVID-19.”

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