The Sacramento Teachers Union is filing a complaint against SCUSD

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The Sacramento Teachers Association, the union representing Sacramento City Unified teachers, has filed a formal complaint against the school district over its latest proposal to negotiate compensation for lost days from the strike earlier this year. The strike by SCTA and Section 1021 of the International Union of Service Workers resulted in eight days of training lost after unsuccessful negotiations between the two unions and SCUSD. The talks included talks on competitive wages and health plans. After reaching an agreement, both sides actively negotiated how to make up for lost time. Last week, the school district proposed to move the end of the year from June 17 to June 24 and introduce a ninth hour of study on certain days. The SCTA has said it is postponing the signing because of a provision it believes is not legal On Tuesday, the SCTA announced unfair work practices to the California Labor Council. If no agreement is reached on how to reimburse these eight days of training, SCUSD could face a $ 47 million fine for failing to meet state-established number of training days and minutes. “The clock is ticking,” SCTA President David Fisher said in a release. “The district will lose millions of dollars in funds that could be used in Sako City classes if they do not take action soon. The inability of the school board to return school days and avoid significant fines is a clear breach of the council’s trust.” it says he agreed to postpone the end of the school year, but claims SCUSD “rejected many of the SCTA’s proposals to ensure that schools are properly staffed during these long days.” It also says the school district rejected SCTA’s offer to conduct a survey for parents to “better understand how many students will be attending makeup days.” On Tuesday, the county issued a statement in response to PERB’s allegations of unfair practice. union – allegations in this complaint.SCUSD said it was trying in good faith to reach an agreement on how to return to students the time of study that students did not receive during the strike. In a statement, the district outlined five proposals it has offered to the SCTA over the past few weeks – “each offers more concessions to the SCTA than the previous one,” the county said. These proposals, the district said, are as follows: provisions passed to the union on April 20 and April 25 require all employees to attend work on additional days, unless leave has not been pre-approved or for good medical reasons. On May 4, the district submitted to the DCTA a proposal to provide more flexibility to staff so that no more than 20% of certified staff in any one school would receive approved leave for an extended period. On Monday, May 9, the county submitted a fourth proposal to the SCTA, which increased the surcharge for approved leave to 25%. On Thursday, May 12, the county adopted a new proposal to the SCTA that would increase the percentage to 30%. SCUSD said in a statement that it “rejects the SCTA’s proposal that all employees who go on strike simply be paid for the area for the days they did not work.”

The Sacramento Teachers Association, the union representing Sacramento City Unified teachers, has filed a formal complaint with the school district over the latest proposal to negotiate to make up for lost days from the strike earlier this year.

A strike by SCTA and Division 1021 of the International Union of Employees resulted in the loss of eight days of training following unsuccessful negotiations between the two unions and SCUSD. The talks focused on competitive wages and health plans.

Having reached an agreement, both sides are actively negotiating how to make up for lost time. Last week, the school district proposed to move the end of the year from June 17 to June 24 and introduce a ninth hour of study on certain days. The SCTA has said it is postponing the signing due to a provision it considers illegitimate.

Related | Sac City Unified, the teachers ’union disputes how to make up for time lost after the strike

On Tuesday, SCTA announced unfair work practices to the California Labor Relations Council. If no agreement is reached on how to reimburse these eight days of training, SCUSD could face a $ 47 million fine for failing to meet state-established number of training days and minutes.

“The clock is ticking,” SCTA President David Fisher said in a release. “The district will lose millions of dollars of funds that could have been used in Sako City classes if they do not take action soon. The inability of the school board to return school days and avoid significant fines is a clear breach of the council’s trust.”

The teachers’ union said in a release that it had agreed to postpone the end of the school year, but said SCUSD “rejected many of the SCTA’s proposals to ensure that schools were properly staffed during these long days”. It also says the school district rejected SCTA’s offer to conduct a parent survey to “better understand how many students will attend makeup days.”

The district issued a statement Tuesday in response to PERB’s allegations of unfair practice by the union – allegations in the complaint.

SCUSD said it was working in good faith to reach an agreement on how to return the study time that students did not receive during the strike.

In its statement, the county outlined five proposals it has offered to the SCTA over the past few weeks – “each offers more concessions to the SCTA than the previous one,” the statement said.

These proposals, as told in the area, are:

  • The provisions handed over to the union on April 20 and April 25 oblige all employees to be present at work on additional days if the leave has not been pre-approved or for valid medical reasons.
  • On May 4, the district submitted to the DCTA a proposal to provide more staff flexibility so that no more than 20% of certified staff at one school received approved leave over a long period.
  • On Monday, May 9, the district submitted a fourth proposal to the DCTA, which increased the allowance for approved time off to 25%.
  • On Thursday, May 12, the district submitted to the DCTA a new proposal to increase the percentage to 30%.

SCUSD further said in a statement that it “rejected the DCTA’s proposal that all striking employees simply be paid for the area for days they did not work.”

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