The study shows the effect of sleep-disordered breathing in adults over 70 years of age

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A recent study by Monash University researchers found that even mild cases of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), the most common type of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), are associated with a lower quality of life associated with physical health as well as low cognitive function. . .

In a baseline analysis of ASPrin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE), SNORE ASA (The Study of Neurocognitive Outcomes, Radiological and Retinal Effects of Aspirin and Retinal Effects of Aspirin and Retinal Effects of Aspirin in Sleep Apnoea), the study looked at 1,400 healthy Australians aged 70 years and older found that just over 80 percent of participants had the form of SDB and did not know.

Twenty-five percent of women and 36 percent of men had moderate and severe SDB, while OSA syndrome, which is characterized by the presence of SDB with significant daytime drowsinesspresent in more than seven and nearly six percent of men and women respectively.

The results are now published in Respirology.

Lead Research Fellow Dr. Stephanie Ward, Ph.D. A candidate from the Monash School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, as well as a geriatric practitioner, said the study wants to find out whether SDB, common in older populations, is clinically significant in this age group. The study examined associations with health measures that are important for older peopleincluding mood, daytime drowsiness, quality of life, and cognitive function.

The SNORE ASA ASPREE study aims to shed more light on the association of SDB with the risk of cognition and dementia and will examine the association of SDB with cognition change over time as well as with neuroimaging and biomarkers of retinal vascular pathology.

This recently published study examined the transverse, baseline associations of this study. “SDB is so common as we age. Understanding the extent to which it matters clinically is important,” Dr. Ward said. “SDB can be a risk factor for dementia as we age. We already know about many others risk factors for dementia, such as physically inactive, socially isolated, hearing impaired, hypertension, and obesity. The results of this study do confirm the association of SDB with lower cognitive function, but whether SDB increases the risk of decreased cognition over time, and what is important, whether it prevents SDB treatment dementiawe have yet to see. ”


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Additional information:
Stephanie A. Ward et al., Sleep-disordered breathing has been associated with decreased quality of life and cognitive functions related to health, in a cross-sectional study of the elderly, Respirology (2022). DOI: 10.1111 / corresponding.14279

Citation: A study shows the impact of sleep-disordered breathing in adults over 70 (2022, May 19), obtained May 19, 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-05-reveals-impact-sleep- disordered-adults.html

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