The report confirms the loss of student learning caused by the pandemic

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New evidence has emerged showing how much the COVID-19 pandemic has affected student learning loss in the classroom. Those effects — declining reading and math scores in most states — were noted in the latest edition of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or The Nation’s Report Card. The report compares fourth- and eighth-grade math and reading test scores before the pandemic in 2019 and after the pandemic this year.| MORE | Click here to compare 2019 and 2020 math test scores. In eighth grade, all states except Utah showed a decline in math scores. More than three dozen saw a similar decline in fourth grade. By fourth grade, most states saw declines in reading test scores. | MORE | Click here to read the test results. “I don’t make this statement lightly, because this is not the kind of data I typically associate with cause-and-effect results,” said Peggy Carr, commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics. “But now it’s very clear that we’re seeing unprecedented disruption in everyone’s lives, including students, their academic careers, you know, really messed up, really messed up. It’s because of the pandemic.” Moving forward, Carr said school systems need to use this data to “reset” and refocus on tutoring and tutoring programs, as well as social and emotional mental health services for students. In response to the new data Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office said it underscores the need to continue investing in education programs that support students. “California has focused on keeping children safe during the pandemic while making record investments to mitigate learning losses and transform our education system,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom. Newsom. “While California students have experienced less learning loss during the pandemic than most other states, these results are not a celebration, but a call to action — students are struggling with academic work, and we must continue to get them “That’s why we made record investments in education, created a new pre-school, implemented everything added free meals, expanded before and after school programs, strengthened mental health and more,” Newsom continued.

There is new evidence showing how much the COVID-19 pandemic has affected student learning loss in the classroom.

Those effects—decreasing reading and math scores in most states—were noted in the latest edition of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or The Nation’s Report Card.

The report compares fourth- and eighth-grade math and reading test scores before the pandemic in 2019 and after the pandemic this year.

| MORE | Click here to compare 2019 and 2020 math test results

In eighth grade, all states except Utah showed a decline in math scores. More than three dozen saw similar declines in fourth grade.

By fourth grade, most states saw declines in reading test scores.

| MORE | Click here to read the test results

“I don’t make this statement lightly, because these are not data that I would normally associate with cause and effect,” said Peggy Carr, commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics. “But now it’s very clear that we’re seeing unprecedented disruption in everyone’s lives, including students, their academic careers, you know, really messed up, really messed up. It’s because of the pandemic.”

Moving forward, Carr said school systems need to use the data to “reboot” and refocus on tutoring and tutoring programs, as well as social and emotional mental health services for students.

In response to the new data, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office said it shows the need to continue investing in educational programs that support students.

“California has focused on keeping children safe during the pandemic while making record investments to mitigate learning losses and transform our education system,” Newsom said. “While California students experienced less learning loss than students in most other states during the pandemic, these results are not a celebration, but a call to action — students are struggling academically, and we must continue to provide them with the resources they need to succeed.”

“That’s why we’ve made record investments in education, created a new preschool, implemented universal free meals, expanded before- and after-school programs, strengthened mental health and more,” Newsom continued.

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